Exploring Taboo Language and Euphemisms in 'Fight Club' (1999): An Analysis of American Cultural Norms through the Lens of Cultural Linguistics

Authors

  • Alizey Haroon M. Phil Scholar, Department of English, National University of Modern Languages, Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan
  • Muhammad Farukh Arslan Lecturer, Department of English, National University of Modern Languages, Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47205/plhr.2024(8-II)32

Keywords:

Countercultural Themes, Cultural Norms, Euphemisms, Taboo Language

Abstract

This study explores the representation of taboo language and euphemisms in David Fincher's "Fight Club" (1999), aiming to understand their reflection of late-1990s American cultural norms and societal disillusionment. Framed within Allan and Burridge's (2006) theoretical perspectives on euphemisms and Timothy Jay's (1992) work on taboo language, a qualitative content analysis of the film's script was conducted. Findings reveal a prevalence of profanity with 46 instances noted, alongside strategic use of euphemisms, notably 20 instances referring to death and killing, and 13 instances related to sexual activity. These linguistic choices underscore countercultural themes, portraying characters' resistance to societal norms. The study highlights the intricate relationship between language, culture, and social dynamics, suggesting further exploration of linguistic choices in media narratives to illuminate broader cultural phenomena, aiding in the understanding of authenticity and rebellion within contemporary society

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Published

2024-05-02

Details

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    PDF Downloads: 41

How to Cite

Haroon, A., & Arslan, M. F. (2024). Exploring Taboo Language and Euphemisms in ’Fight Club’ (1999): An Analysis of American Cultural Norms through the Lens of Cultural Linguistics. Pakistan Languages and Humanities Review, 8(2), 361–376. https://doi.org/10.47205/plhr.2024(8-II)32

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