Feminism and Women Empowerment: Ambiguities and Conflicts of Feminism in Pakistan

Authors

  • Ghulam Sarwar PhD Scholar (International Relations), Department of Political Science, University of the Punjab Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan
  • Umar Daraz Visiting Lecturer, School of Communication Studies, University of the Punjab Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan
  • Muhammad Saif Ullah Visiting Lecturer, Department of Political Science, University of the Punjab Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47205/plhr.2022(6-IV)36

Keywords:

Eastern Feminism, Feminism, Pakistan, Western Feminism, Women Activism, Women Empowerment

Abstract

Feminism has largely been considered an alien concept in the non-west, contrary to indigenous traditions and norms. Western feminism colonial intrusion is easily discredited as an attack on the cultural authenticity of non-west societies and a corrupting influence. The paper is an effort to frame women’s concerns in the context of their situation rather than with reference to the standard set by western feminism. This is a qualitative theoretical study that uses the methodology of discourse analysis and implies the theoretical framework to analyze feminism’s conflicting perceptions and perspectives in Pakistan. This paper seeks to examine the diverse voices and lived experiences of women and answers the questions of how western discourses are devoid of issues and lived experiences of the women of third-world countries as well as how western feminism is different from eastern feminism in narratives, demands, and needs. Empowerment through feminism activism in Pakistan which is the phenomenon of this study analyzes the structural description enlightens the interpretative process and emphasizes on ‘how this phenomenon is realized by the women.

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Published

2022-12-10

Details

    Abstract Views: 203
    PDF Downloads: 210

How to Cite

Sarwar, G., Daraz, U., & Saif Ullah, M. (2022). Feminism and Women Empowerment: Ambiguities and Conflicts of Feminism in Pakistan. Pakistan Languages and Humanities Review, 6(4), 394–404. https://doi.org/10.47205/plhr.2022(6-IV)36